Mattress storein Sullivan's Island, SC

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Sleep King - Where the Prices Are a Sweet Dream!

There are a lot of mattress companies in South Carolina that claim to have the perfect mattress for everyone. At Sleep King, we believe that every person is different and has different needs when it comes to their mattress. That's why our mattress store in Sullivan's Island, SC, has a wide variety of beds and brands to choose from. That way, you can find the right mattress for your body and get the very best sleep quality possible.

As a family-owned and operated mattress store with more than 40 years of experience in the sleep industry, we know a thing or two about comfortable mattresses. Sullivan's Island residents choose Sleep King because we provide our customers with a personalized shopping experience. When you walk through our showroom doors, we want you to feel comfortable - both on our mattresses and with our store associates. At Sleep King, you won't ever have to worry about pushy salespeople and limited selection. Instead, you will discover that we encourage you to take your time as you search for your next bed. Sleep is incredibly important, and by proxy, finding the right mattress for your body type is too.

When you visit our showroom in Sullivan's Island, know that we are a full-service store with mattress experts ready to help. From questions about mattresses and their warranties to financing and mattress delivery, there's no question we haven't heard before.

We carry some of the most popular brands in America, and unlike other mattress stores in Sullivan's Island, offer them at the lowest prices around, guaranteed. There's a reason why we were voted your #1 mattress store in the Lowcountry - because we truly care about our customers and their quality of sleep!

Looking for discounts? Need to buy your mattress on a strict budget? We've got you covered at our new mattress clearance center in Sullivan's Island, where we have more than 50 models on display at 50-80% off retail value. Don't forget to ask us about our flexible financing options, where no credit is needed to make a purchase. Paying cash? We'll knock 5% off your bill!

As if that weren't enough reason to visit, remember that we provide free delivery, setup, and removal of your old mattress for FREE when you make a purchase at Sleep king.

What Clients Say About Us

Why Choose Our Mattress
Store in Sullivan's Island, SC?

Our business model is simple - give customers quality beds from national brands at amazing prices, coupled with unmatched customer service. We know that your sleep is essential but also understand that normal folks aren't made of money. You need a solution that isn't going to break the bank, which is why we offer up to 75% off our products.

Mattress Company Sullivan's Island, SC

When we say we have a bed for every budget, we're serious.
A few of our mix and match deals include:

Sets Prize
Twin Mattress Sets Beginning at $99
Full Mattress Sets Beginning at $139
Queen Mattress Sets Beginning at $149
King Mattress Sets Beginning at $299

Of course, a mattress would be incomplete without a headboard, footboard, and rails. For queen mattresses, those items combined are only $199. At our mattress store, we pledge to beat any competitor's price on similar product specs - guaranteed! Here are just a few of the benefits of shopping at Mattress King

  • *FREE* Bed Frame for Your New Bed*
  • *FREE* Same-Day Local Mattress Delivery to Your Home*
  • *FREE* Set-Up & Removal of Old Mattress from Your Home*
  • *FREE* Mattress Pad Included with New Mattress*
  • Rest Easy with Our 60-Day Comfort Guarantee
  • We Have the Best Selection of Mattresses in Sullivan's Island with Five National Vendors
  • On-Time Delivery
  • Best Warranties in the Industry
  • Sleep King Will Beat Anyone's Advertise Price by $50*(on purchases $299 and above)
  • 0% Financing for 48 Months (APR, With Approved Credit)
  • *See Store for Additional Details
Our Selection of National Mattress Brands

Our Selection of
National Mattress
Brands

At Sleep King, we carry the largest selection of high-quality national brand mattresses in Sullivan's Island.

 Mattress Store Sullivan's Island, SC
 King Mattresses Sullivan's Island, SC

Sleep King MLILY Mattresses

Often considered the best mattress brand in the world, innovation sets MLILY mattresses apart from others. Our customers love MLILY mattresses because they are expertly built through decades of research and rigorous testing. The folks at MLILY are committed to precision, meaning every detail of product detail they push is geared towards the ultimate satisfaction and comfort.

 Adjustable Mattresses Sullivan's Island, SC

Sleep Restonic Mattresses

Restonic Mattresses: Restonic line of mattresses are multi-layered beds with cooling foam technology that adds resilience, support, and temperature control. The result is a cool, comfy sleep that leaves you refreshed and ready to attack the day.

 Bedroom Furniture Sullivan's Island, SC

Sleep King Comfort Sleep Mattresses

Every mattress in the Comfort Sleep lineup has a great combo of support and comfort, making for a restful night's sleep. With heavy-gauge coils and high-performance materials, these mattresses are durable and built to last. Be sure to try one of these mattresses out in our showroom - our customers love the pocketed coils and minimal motion transfer.

 Bedroom Suits Sullivan's Island, SC

Sleep King Golden Mattresses

The Golden brand is lesser known than some, like Tempurpedic. Still, it is a quality product with many foam and non-foam options that we think you'll love. Choose from standard memory foam, hybrid, and innerspring options while visiting our showroom in Sullivan's Island.

Tips on Choosing the Best Bed

There's much more to choosing a good bed than how you think it will look in your bedroom. There's plenty to think about, from innerspring options to memory foam and even hybrid mattresses. At Sleep King, our priority is our customers. We pride ourselves on excellent customer service. We want to do right by you, which why we want to be sure you find the perfect bed when you visit our mattress store in Sullivan's Island, SC. To help you get started, here are a few tips on choosing the best bed for your sleep needs.

Visit a Showroom

Visit a Showroom

This tip might seem like a no-brainer to some, but it's important that you visit a showroom so that you can lay on different beds to get a feel for what you like. At Mattress King, you will have the chance to explore different styles, designs, and shapes, and mattress materials. Finding a bed online at a price you can afford is great, but you should lie on the bed first, not just look at it on a screen.

 Full Bedroom Sets Sullivan's Island, SC
Determine Budget

Determine Budget

Here's a surprising fact: just because a mattress costs more money, it doesn't mean it's going to be a better bed. Sure, more expensive beds might have newer technologies and materials, but not everyone has the budget to walk into a mattress store in Sullivan's Island and spend $3,000. Figure out what price range you're comfortable paying and look at the best options for your bottom line.

 Furniture Store Sullivan's Island, SC
Consider Bedroom Size

Consider Bedroom Size

Before you swing by our showroom and start trying out beds, it might be a good idea to measure the space where your new mattress will go. If your bedroom is on the small side, a king-sized bed might be too big. Similarly, a small bed in a huge room might make for strange aesthetics. Aim for a reasonable amount of room around your bed - enough where you can walk around comfortably. As mentioned above, get specific measurements of the area you plan to use. That way, you have peace of mind knowing your new mattress will fit in your bedroom.

 Furniture Showroom Sullivan's Island, SC
Consider Bedroom Size

Choose a Mattress Material

This tip often comes down to personal preference. It will take a little bit of trial and error to figure out which material works best for your back - innerspring, memory foam, or latex. While your friend's and family's opinions matter, keep in mind that their mattress choice was subjective. What works for them won't necessarily work for you.

Need a quick refresher on different mattress materials? Here's a quick overview
 King Bedroom Sets Sullivan's Island, SC

Innerspring

Also called coil mattresses, innerspring beds are probably the most well-known on this short list. Innerspring mattresses are often more affordable than their latex and memory foam counterparts. These beds are ideal for people who want a lot of support and a cooler night's sleep.

Latex

This material is known for its great cooling properties and overall comfort. With latex, there are no strange off-gassing odors like you sometimes get with memory foam. Latex mattresses are ideal for people who want a responsive, bouncy feel and may have problems sleeping hot.

Memory Foam

First developed by NASA in the 70s, memory foam is probably the most popular material in the modern mattress market. Memory foam conforms to every inch of your body, giving you maximum comfort and support. Memory foam is also know for its anti-motion properties. Memory foam can be a great choice if you tend to toss and turn at night and sleep with a partner who wakes up when you do. Memory foam mattresses are ideal for people who need pressure relief, good support, and refreshing comfort.

Think About Your Back

Think About Your Back

If you have a bad back, it's crucial that you find a mattress with proper support. Slat and spring beds often offer plenty of support, but latex and memory foam options have come a long way. If you want memory foam or latex but find the support to be subpar, consider an adjustable base instead of a normal platform. That way, you can always sleep in a comfortable position that benefits your back.

Mattress Company Sullivan's Island, SC

Your Premier Furniture Store
Sullivan's Island, SC

You read that right! Sleep King is the first choice for quality beds in Sullivan's Island, but we also have a huge selection of furniture for your home. If you're looking for a one-stop-shop for mattresses and furniture alike, you have come to the right place. If you're shopping for a new mattress at the best price possible, why not throw in a bedroom suite at an amazing price too?

A few common furniture items that our customers love to add
to their mattress purchase include:
 Mattress Store Sullivan's Island, SC

Living Room Sets - from traditional-style suites with classic textures to modern sets with attractive upholstery, we will help you find the best living room set for your home.

Bedroom Suites - our bedroom suites range from contemporary to classic and come in a variety of colors and styles to compliment your new mattress purchase.

Daybeds - from English-style daybeds available in espresso and cherry colors to multi-purpose beds with pull-out trundles, our selection of daybeds is unbeatable.

Futons - if you have younger children, they will love our futons. Who are we kidding? Adults do too! Futons are incredibly useful in small spaces and convert into comfy-cozy beds perfect for kids of all ages.

Bunkbeds - bunkbeds are another great option to consider if you have kids. Whether you have a classic-style home or an apartment, we have a style that fits you.

At Sleep King, we are proud to have the lowest prices in the Lowcountry

If you like what you see but don't have time to visit our mattress store in Sullivan's Island, don't worry. Our online store is bursting with new items and deals every day. From mattresses and bedding to furniture sets and special sale items, Mattress King has got it all. With the highest quality mattresses, the best prices in Sullivan's Island, a giant showroom with all the options, and a full team of helpful sales associates, you won't ever need to find another mattress and furniture store again!

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Message From The Sullivan’s Island Mayor: April 2022

Dear island neighbors,Just a few items this time, the first of which definitely affects all of us, every day. We are flushed with excitement to invite you to…NEWLY REBUILT SEWERThe ribbon-cutting for our newly rebuilt Wastewater Treatment Plant (sewage plant) and associated system improvements. On Friday, April 29 at 1 p.m., we will officially celebrate the completion of a $25 million-dollar, multi-year project to make necessary replacements and improvements, and vital resiliency enhancements, to what had been an ...

Dear island neighbors,

Just a few items this time, the first of which definitely affects all of us, every day. We are flushed with excitement to invite you to…

NEWLY REBUILT SEWER

The ribbon-cutting for our newly rebuilt Wastewater Treatment Plant (sewage plant) and associated system improvements. On Friday, April 29 at 1 p.m., we will officially celebrate the completion of a $25 million-dollar, multi-year project to make necessary replacements and improvements, and vital resiliency enhancements, to what had been an aging system. The event will be at the plant, at 2051 Gull Avenue (behind Town Hall and Fire Station). The ribbon-cutting and few short speeches will commence at 1 p.m., but you are invited to attend any time until 3 p.m.. With our Fire Station and Maintenance/Storage Building construction project, parking close to the plant will be limited, so if you can bike or walk, that is advisable. You might be surprised to learn that our original treatment plant was built back in 1968. Those early Island leaders were truly environmentally conscious and visionary in moving the island away from septic tanks. Bear in mind that the tax base of the Island then was tiny compared to the present or recent past. You might also be surprised to learn how many coastal locations continue to rely on septic tanks to this day, at least in part. The original treatment plant equipment had reached the end of its useful life. Further, our growing vulnerability to flooding and sea level rise, and increased awareness of the threat from seismic events (aka earthquakes), made it essential that we not only build back but build back higher and stronger. And the threat of electric outages from various causes necessitated more reliable backup generators at the treatment plant and sewer lift stations (pump stations). At the same time, the miles of sewer mains (pipes) that constitute our collection system were equally aged, in some cases even older (back to 1938). As with old collection systems in cities and towns across America, the system was vulnerable to what’s called “I and I” (Inflow and Infiltration), which means stormwater and groundwater entering the sewer system, greatly increasing the flow into the treatment plant and possibly taxing its capacity. Unlike water mains which are under pressure, sewer mains with leaks are not likely to discharge much of their contents into the surrounding earth. They are more vulnerable to intrusion from groundwater and stormwater. Sewage treatment plants are not built to treat rain or groundwater. So with this project, we have endeavored to produce a secure, resilient and functional wastewater system that will serve us for at least the next 50 years. Many people have worked long and hard to achieve this milestone, but I can only name a few here. Greg Gress is the leader of our great Water and Sewer Department, which includes all the folks who work so hard to ensure that we always have good water coming into our homes and “used” water flowing away from our homes to where it can be properly treated. Town Administrator Andy Benke has ably overseen this biggest-ever collection of Town capital projects.

The Councilmembers most involved in this project have been those who serve on the very hard-working Water and Sewer Committee. The current Chair is Bachman Smith, whose background in construction law and tireless dedication have been invaluable in this effort. His predecessor W&S Chairs, Susan Middaugh and Debra Hazen-Martin, also worked extremely hard in championing and shepherding the many years of earlier efforts to get these projects started.

Many other former Councilmembers have served on the W&S Committee; I apologize that I can’t list them all here, but the current members with Bachman are Gary Visser and Scott Millimet.

Please come out to the ribbon-cutting so you can see first-hand what has been accomplished.

BUDGET TIME

Council is deeply involved in the annual monthslong budgeting process. You can visit the Town website (Council Meetings) to see the draft budgets we have been reviewing thus far, and continue to watch or attend our workshop and regular meetings in May and June in which we finalize the budget. More importantly, you can attend regular meetings and the Public Hearing on the budget if you wish to provide input during public comments. Please visit the Town’s home page and click on “Upcoming Meetings and Agendas” for the dates and times.

BEACH TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT UPDATE

We continue to work with the leadership of the Isle of Palms, Mount Pleasant and Folly Beach, and media representatives, to develop a coordinated program of outreach to the greater Charleston area to apprise potential day visitors of real-time traffic conditions. Hopefully they will then factor that info into their travel decisions before heading to the beach. Stay tuned for more details soon.

See you around the island!

Pat O’Neil, Mayor

843-670-9266

Twitter: @oneilpm1

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

Review: ‘Into the Woods’ is the right show for right now (by the right company, too)

After the past two years of strange new terrain, we all know what it feels like to be thrust into the great unknown.And when it comes to musical theater, no one mined the complexities of modern life with equal parts emotional depth and abiding elan in quite the way that Stephen Sondheim did.The heralded composer and lyricist was such a touchstone that his death in November at age 91 inspired a groundswell of mourning that for one gulp-inducing, glistening moment transformed my Twitter feed into a stronghold of tenderness....

After the past two years of strange new terrain, we all know what it feels like to be thrust into the great unknown.

And when it comes to musical theater, no one mined the complexities of modern life with equal parts emotional depth and abiding elan in quite the way that Stephen Sondheim did.

The heralded composer and lyricist was such a touchstone that his death in November at age 91 inspired a groundswell of mourning that for one gulp-inducing, glistening moment transformed my Twitter feed into a stronghold of tenderness.

With all that in mind, the timing of a new production of Sondheim’s celebrated 1986 musical, “Into the Woods,” was, in a word, apt. Who else could gently, smilingly guide us from a world constructed of clear-cut, attainable goals to one with murky, messy outcomes?

That is, after all, the thrust of the musical. It takes some of our favorite Brothers Grimm fairy tales, then twists and intertwines them in ways that offer us all new inroads to the tricky task of being human. Red Riding Hood, for instance, has agency in some of Jack’s decisions regarding that bean stalk. Cinderella gets entangled with the baker and his wife, with her prince in hot pursuit.

And it all plays out in song after stirring song, weaving the characters together and setting them apart, wending from the affable and catchy then wading deeper in ways that feel so curiously, ingeniously good for the soul.

It could also be said that Holy City Arts & Lyric Opera, or HALO as it’s known, was just the musical company for the job. In the perilous thicket of the pandemic, they launched Social Distance-SING!, regularly loading a pickup truck with a Fox Music House piano to bring opera to neighborhoods, free of charge.

This fall, general director Leah Edwards and artistic director Dimitri Pittas (who are married) launched HALO’s first full season with a production of “La traviata” at the Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park. Opera at The Joe, you ask? Yes, opera at The Joe. And, yes, it really worked.

So staging “Into the Woods” outside at Battery Gadsden Cultural Center on Sullivan’s Island represents the latest in HALO’s tradition of eschewing tradition.

For the production, they again tapped Ted Sperling as director. It should be noted that he comes to HALO with some serious Broadway bona fides, having served as music director for recent productions including “My Fair Lady” and “Fiddler on the Roof” (and starting with his first job as keyboard player for the original production of Sondheim’s and James Lapine’s “Sunday in the Park with George”).

It should also be noted that the effort necessary to mount this winning production was Herculean.

First off, it required building a theater on the site of historic fort and topping it off with a smart set that took full advantage of its surrounding forest. We were, literally, into the woods. Scenic designer Michael E. Downs did so to effective end, devising various platforms of rustic wood, on which all of the many places and plots could play out.

And then there’s that layered score, which entailed harnessing the talent to land one song after the next with equal parts vocal mastery and emotional resonance.

HALO did this by both bringing in some professional vocalists from afar, as well as grounding the show with local talent (among them Scott Pattison of PURE Theatre and Katie Small of Small Opera, as well as the local musicians who formed the live orchestra for the production, many of whom are bold-face names with Charleston Symphony). The result was a mix that was effective on stage and promising for Charleston’s artistic ecosystem.

About that talent: This is a production powered more by those phenomenal pipes than dramatic performances.

As Cinderella, Ashley Fabian transformed the crisp night air into a thing of stirring beauty. In the second act, when Brian Cali as Baker finally got his hard-earned big vocal moment after driving all that plot, he floored. As Rapunzel, Ashley Emerson also hit all the right notes, perfectly leveraging that stellar soprano voice to punctuate the action.

Some of the acting stood out. Audrey C. Black’s cheeky Red Riding Hood was just the ticket to portray the knife-wielding upstart, and was well-matched by Schyler Vargas’ lip-smacking Wolf. He was also comic catnip in his other role as Cinderella’s Prince, alongside Julian Black Gordon’s irresistibly grin-eliciting go at Rapunzel’s Prince. As Jack, Khamary Rose delivered true emotional resonance that served as the production’s moral core.

There were ample laughs, too, as evidenced by the convivial, all-in audience. I would contend there is even more humor to be coaxed from these Grimm characters rendered by Sondheim as all-too-humorously-human.

Props go to Carla Woods as Jack’s mother for such a coax, as well as her unflagging comic timing. And as Baker’s Wife, Molly Mustonen showed us her funny with her second-act (and vocal talents) in her stolen moments with Cinderella’s Prince.

Still, it is a delicate balance, this Sondheim business, as beneath all of the infectiously accessible spins on the Grimms, we eventually discover the lost little sheep that these Grimm figures are — well, that we all are. We are not, come to find out, out of the woods after all.

To wit: After suffering the bad behavior of The Witch for much of the show, I was utterly choked up by Marina Pires’ gutting rendition of “Stay with Me,” dreading as I already do the inevitable moment when my own daughter takes wing.

And, after all goes horribly awry and Fabian, Black, Cali Rose and Pires masterfully play the blame game in “Your Fault,” all excepting The Witch come together in “No One Is Alone,” a powerful message in these times when isolation was so unexpectedly thrust upon all of us.

All this, naturally, was buoyed by the exceptional musicianship of the 15-member live orchestra, which was situated nearby and which also offered many an uncannily-timed sound effect for the performers throughout.

With such riches on display, I’ll chalk up one or two flubbed lines and dead mics to opening-night vagaries, and I’m thinking you would too.

There is enough top talent and goodwill on offer to take a page from Sondheim’s book, and assure this inventive, ambitious, excellent Charleston company, who repeatedly go the distance to animate our spaces with song and heart, that they are not in it alone.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last minute tickets and little-known experiences hand-selected by our newsroom in your inbox each Thursday.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp Set To Open This Month

Staff Report for Island Eye NewsThe team behind Charleston-based hospitality group, Basic Projects, has announced the official opening of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, opening this month at 2019 Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island. Designed to feel like an old-school fish camp, Sullivan’s is a casual and family-friendly neighborhood spot serving dayboat seafood, cold drinks and frozen cocktails. Influenced by its seaside location, Sullivan’s presents a bright, contemporary take on the traditional Southern fish camp, off...

Staff Report for Island Eye News

The team behind Charleston-based hospitality group, Basic Projects, has announced the official opening of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, opening this month at 2019 Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island. Designed to feel like an old-school fish camp, Sullivan’s is a casual and family-friendly neighborhood spot serving dayboat seafood, cold drinks and frozen cocktails. Influenced by its seaside location, Sullivan’s presents a bright, contemporary take on the traditional Southern fish camp, offering a fresh perspective grounded in nostalgia and rooted in highquality offerings and local ingredients. The Sullivan’s team is made up of familiar faces including Owners/Operators Ben and Kate Towill; GM Jonathan Bentley, who worked for many years at neighboring restaurant The Obstinate Daughter; Executive Chef Davis Hood; and Bar Manager Jordan Moton. Sullivan’s is the third concept from Basic Projects, who also own and operate Basic Kitchen in Charleston and Post House Inn in Mount Pleasant. The team lovingly restored the iconic Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant, a family-run institution that was known for its shrimp and grits, homemade Key Lime pie and small beach town feel for over 30 years. The original Sullivan’s opened in 1988, just before Hurricane Hugo hit and nearly destroyed the restaurant. Owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott rebuilt, and Sullivan’s became a tradition for island visitors and locals alike for a quarter century.

Basic Projects hopes to bring this treasured institution forward into the next 30 years, preserving the elements that endeared it to the community while introducing a fresh take on the neighborhood landmark.

Having grown up on IOP, jumping off jetties and finding any bit of surf, Chef Hood has developed a menu true to his history and personality – playful, perfect for the beach and inspired by Southern ingredients. With a focus on local fisherman and farmers, Chef Hood’s menu is filled with fresh and playful iterations of the Fish Camp classics, balancing fried seafood baskets, with bright crudos, daily oysters, First Jetty seafood towers, and perfected lobster rolls. Fittingly, the dessert menu features soft serve with extra sprinkles, a beach town delicacy.

A seaside restaurant wouldn’t be complete without a long list of cold drinks and Sullivan’s cocktail program delivers with a variety of classic and modern drinks. Moton takes notes from the 70’s tiki craze with MaiTais and Daiquiris, a Frozen Paloma on tap, cold beer and a full wine list. Highlights include the “Banana Hammock” with whisky, coconut, banana and bitters, and the “Big Gulp,” a large format cocktail served in a glass blown fish bottle.

Continuing with the seaside summer holiday theme, a merch shack at the front of the restaurant is well stocked with beachy totes, iconic tees and hats, along with bottle openers and boat float keychains. The design direction of Sullivan’s speaks to its core identity as a Fish Camp brought forward into the next thirty years. Kate Towill, founder and creative director of Basic Projects, designed the restaurant and worked with several local artists and tradesmen to create a space that is rooted in Sullivan’s Island and South Carolina. Island resident and local artist Mickey Williams created an old English pub sign for the restaurant exterior, and Duane Raver, the legendary artist of the original SCDNR fishing charts, loaned Sullivan’s his illustrations for their placemats. Custom stained glass Billiard lamps by Charlestowne Stained Glass Studio and millwork by local craftsman Ryan McKiernanround out the statement pieces. Other notable design elements include an oversized map of Sullivan’s Island commissioned by Nicaraguan artist Augusto Silva. Quite like stepping into the cabin of a 70’s sailboat, the dining room is furnished with lacquered wood of sea-faring sensibility. The floors are a checkered bright yellow and cream linoleum tile, and a mix of vintage pieces and art and colorful, playful patterns bring a sense of whimsy throughout. The team worked with local design firm SDCO on thoughtful branding elements with a sense of humor, including quirky signage, custom ceramic plates and drinkware, and fully outfitted merch shack filled with tees, totes, hats, boat floats and bottle openers.

Sullivan’s will be open for lunch and dinner service, Monday through Sunday, and reservations will soon be released on Resy. For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com and follow @sullivansfishcamp on social media.

Bull reds make their springtime return to Charleston waters

One of the first things experienced saltwater anglers make note of in the springtime is the flicks on the water’s surface as menhaden make their way back up the coast. And if menhaden are here, that certainly means large predators such as bull redfish are not far behind.“They’re just following the food. The big reds winter off the wrecks out to 75 feet (heading offshore when the water temperature drops too low for their comfort). When the bait shows up, they follow the bait,” explained Capt. Chuck Griffin of Ch...

One of the first things experienced saltwater anglers make note of in the springtime is the flicks on the water’s surface as menhaden make their way back up the coast. And if menhaden are here, that certainly means large predators such as bull redfish are not far behind.

“They’re just following the food. The big reds winter off the wrecks out to 75 feet (heading offshore when the water temperature drops too low for their comfort). When the bait shows up, they follow the bait,” explained Capt. Chuck Griffin of Charleston Sport Fishing (fishingcharleston.com), noting that the bait migration has been going on since early April. He said the menhaden currently are small “but they’re feeding on them.”

Asked what he considers a “bull red,” Griffin said anything over 15 pounds. Redfish, also known as red drum, run the size gamut from keeper reds (15 to 23 inches, no more than two per angler per day or six per boat) all the way up to the 75-pound state record caught in 1965 out of Murrells Inlet, a mark which cannot be broken because of the size limits in place.

“I used to say anything over 20 pounds was a bull red, but it seems like they’re a little smaller now. I think it’s a big redfish, anything over 35 inches long,” Griffin said.

Griffin, who has been charter fishing for 35 years, said in the past he would see several fish over 50 pounds, but 30 pounds is now a big mark. He said most of the fish the Charleston fishing captains are catching range from 12 to 18 pounds.

As the water temperature continues to rise the big reds also will be running the beaches, but for now the best opportunity to catch a big redfish is spending time along the rocks that form the Charleston Jetties.

“I look for places where water is washing over the rocks. It knocks the bait off and I think the redfish are attracted to that. I look for what you might call spillways,” Griffin said.

“I generally find the fish where the current isn’t running so hard that it’s hard to fish. You want moving water, but you don’t want it screaming.”

Griffin said he tries to anchor on the up-current side of the spillways.

“The thing about the tide is that it’s different in different places. The places I prefer to fish seem to be better on an outgoing tide because it seems there’s more real estate. But you want the bait coming across the rocks, and you want to be up-current,” he said.

Not surprisingly, Griffin’s bait of choice is fresh menhaden. But he said cut menhaden seems to work better than live menhaden with the redfish attracted to the oily scent.

He prefers heavy tackle in order to get the fish to the boat quickly for a healthy release.

“I use spinning tackle because I can cast further but conventional tackle also works,” he said. “I don’t use super light tackle because I don’t want to wear the fish out. These big fish will fight until they almost die, so I prefer heavier gear, 6,000 to 10,000 size spinning reels. That also helps with the sharks you’re going to catch. You can get them in quicker and get more fishing time,” Griffin said.

He uses mainly fish-finder rigs, He starts off with a 20-foot length of 60-pound mono tied to the braid on his spinning reel, slips on a plastic fish-finder rig and attaches a barrel swivel. From the end of the swivel, he will attach a 6- to 8-inch leader and a 6/0 circle hook. He said fish tend to swallow the longer leaders. His preferred weight is a 3-ounce bank, or flat sinker. The triangle, or pyramid, sinker tends to get caught in the rocks.

Griffin said he uses the plastic fish finder rig because they can break away. He said some people use 3-way swivels and tie their weight to one of the swivels with lighter line to create a breakaway rig.

As Griffin noted, bull reds will fight almost to the death so it’s imperative to take care of the fish before releasing it.

“Get that picture fast and handle the fish as little as possible. The faster you get it back in the water, the better off the fish will be,” he said. “If people get a big fish and need to hold them, try to support the body really well. Hanging them upright can damage their internal organs,” Griffin said.

“I use a Boga Grip and let the water go through their mouths for a long time. If you grab the tail when you’re doing that, when they’re still tired they won’t fight you but when they start to fight they’re generally ready to go.

“I don’t like to fish deeper water, like at the Grillage (an area in Charleston Harbor near Sullivan’s Island). I don’t like to fish past 30 feet of water in that area. The fish can’t get back down because their air bladders expand too much. And I don’t like poking a hole in their air bladder because you’re introducing bacteria to the fish.”

America’s Boating Club

America’s Boating Club Charleston will hold boating safety classes May 14, June 4 and June 18 at 1376 Orange Grove Road, Charleston. Classes begin at 9 a.m. and end around 4 p.m. Successful participants earn the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Boater Education Card. The cost is $25 for adults and youth 12-18 are free. Call 843-312-2876 or email lynes@tds.net.

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