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Sleep King – Where the Prices Are a Sweet Dream!

There are a lot of mattress companies in South Carolina that claim to have the perfect mattress for everyone. At Sleep King, we believe that every person is different and has different needs when it comes to their mattress. That’s why our mattress store in Sullivan's Island, SC, has a wide variety of beds and brands to choose from. That way, you can find the right mattress for your body and get the very best sleep quality possible.

As a family-owned and operated mattress store with more than 40 years of experience in the sleep industry, we know a thing or two about comfortable mattresses. Sullivan's Island residents choose Sleep King because we provide our customers with a personalized shopping experience. When you walk through our showroom doors, we want you to feel comfortable – both on our mattresses and with our store associates. At Sleep King, you won’t ever have to worry about pushy salespeople and limited selection. Instead, you will discover that we encourage you to take your time as you search for your next bed. Sleep is incredibly important, and by proxy, finding the right mattress for your body type is too.

When you visit our showroom in Sullivan's Island, know that we are a full-service store with mattress experts ready to help. From questions about mattresses and their warranties to financing and mattress delivery, there’s no question we haven’t heard before.

We carry some of the most popular brands in America, and unlike other mattress stores in Sullivan's Island, offer them at the lowest prices around, guaranteed. There’s a reason why we were voted your #1 mattress store in the Lowcountry – because we truly care about our customers and their quality of sleep!

Looking for discounts? Need to buy your mattress on a strict budget? We’ve got you covered at our new mattress clearance center in Sullivan's Island, where we have more than 50 models on display at 50-80% off retail value. Don’t forget to ask us about our flexible financing options, where no credit is needed to make a purchase. Paying cash? We’ll knock 5% off your bill!

As if that weren’t enough reason to visit, remember that we provide free delivery, setup, and removal of your old mattress for FREE when you make a purchase at Sleep king.

Why Choose Our Mattress
Store in Sullivan's Island, SC?

Our business model is simple – give customers quality beds from national brands at amazing prices, coupled with unmatched customer service. We know that your sleep is essential but also understand that normal folks aren’t made of money. You need a solution that isn’t going to break the bank, which is why we offer up to 75% off our products.

When we say we have a bed for every budget, we’re serious.
A few of our mix and match deals include:

Sets Prize
Twin Mattress Sets Beginning at $99
Full Mattress Sets Beginning at $139
Queen Mattress Sets Beginning at $149
King Mattress Sets Beginning at $299

Of course, a mattress would be incomplete without a headboard, footboard, and rails. For queen mattresses, those items combined are only $199. At our mattress store, we pledge to beat any competitor’s price on similar product specs – guaranteed! Here are just a few of the benefits of shopping at Mattress King

  • *FREE* Bed Frame for Your New Bed*
  • *FREE* Same-Day Local Mattress Delivery to Your Home*
  • *FREE* Set-Up & Removal of Old Mattress from Your Home*
  • *FREE* Mattress Pad Included with New Mattress*
  • Rest Easy with Our 60-Day Comfort Guarantee
  • We Have the Best Selection of Mattresses in Sullivan's Island with Five National Vendors
  • On-Time Delivery
  • Best Warranties in the Industry
  • Sleep King Will Beat Anyone’s Advertise Price by $50*(on purchases $299 and above)
  • 0% Financing for 48 Months (APR, With Approved Credit)
  • *See Store for Additional Details
Our Selection of National Mattress Brands

Our Selection of
National Mattress
Brands

At Sleep King, we carry the largest selection of high-quality national brand mattresses in Sullivan's Island.

Sleep King Tempurpedic Mattresses

Sleep King Tempurpedic Mattresses

Often considered the best mattress brand in the world, innovation sets Tempurpedic mattresses apart from others. Our customers love Tempurpedic mattresses because they are expertly built through decades of research and rigorous testing. The folks at Tempurpedic are committed to precision, meaning every detail of product detail they push is geared towards the ultimate satisfaction and comfort.

Sleep King Serta iComfort Mattresses

Sleep King Serta iComfort Mattresses

Serta iComfort: Serta’s iComfort line of mattresses are multi-layered beds with cooling foam technology that adds resilience, support, and temperature control. The result is a cool, comfy sleep that leaves you refreshed and ready to attack the day.

Sleep King Simmons Beautysleep Mattresses

Sleep King Simmons Beautysleep Mattresses

Every mattress in the Simmons Beautysleep lineup has a great combo of support and comfort, making for a restful night’s sleep. With heavy-gauge coils and high-performance materials, these mattresses are durable and built to last. Be sure to try one of these mattresses out in our showroom – our customers love the pocketed coils and minimal motion transfer.

Sleep King Bed Boss Mattresses

Sleep King Bed Boss Mattresses

The Bed Boss brand is lesser known than some, like Tempurpedic. Still, it is a quality product with many foam and non-foam options that we think you’ll love. Choose from standard memory foam, hybrid, and innerspring options while visiting our showroom in Sullivan's Island.

Tips on Choosing the Best Bed

There’s much more to choosing a good bed than how you think it will look in your bedroom. There’s plenty to think about, from innerspring options to memory foam and even hybrid mattresses. At Sleep King, our priority is our customers. We pride ourselves on excellent customer service. We want to do right by you, which why we want to be sure you find the perfect bed when you visit our mattress store in Sullivan's Island, SC. To help you get started, here are a few tips on choosing the best bed for your sleep needs.

Visit a Showroom

Visit a Showroom

This tip might seem like a no-brainer to some, but it’s important that you visit a showroom so that you can lay on different beds to get a feel for what you like. At Mattress King, you will have the chance to explore different styles, designs, and shapes, and mattress materials. Finding a bed online at a price you can afford is great, but you should lie on the bed first, not just look at it on a screen.

Determine Budget

Determine Budget

Here’s a surprising fact: just because a mattress costs more money, it doesn’t mean it’s going to be a better bed. Sure, more expensive beds might have newer technologies and materials, but not everyone has the budget to walk into a mattress store in Sullivan's Island and spend $3,000. Figure out what price range you’re comfortable paying and look at the best options for your bottom line.

Consider Bedroom Size

Consider Bedroom Size

Before you swing by our showroom and start trying out beds, it might be a good idea to measure the space where your new mattress will go. If your bedroom is on the small side, a king-sized bed might be too big. Similarly, a small bed in a huge room might make for strange aesthetics. Aim for a reasonable amount of room around your bed – enough where you can walk around comfortably. As mentioned above, get specific measurements of the area you plan to use. That way, you have peace of mind knowing your new mattress will fit in your bedroom.

Consider Bedroom Size

Choose a Mattress Material

This tip often comes down to personal preference. It will take a little bit of trial and error to figure out which material works best for your back – innerspring, memory foam, or latex. While your friend’s and family’s opinions matter, keep in mind that their mattress choice was subjective. What works for them won’t necessarily work for you.

Need a quick refresher on different mattress materials? Here’s a quick overview

Innerspring

Also called coil mattresses, innerspring beds are probably the most well-known on this short list. Innerspring mattresses are often more affordable than their latex and memory foam counterparts. These beds are ideal for people who want a lot of support and a cooler night’s sleep.

Latex

This material is known for its great cooling properties and overall comfort. With latex, there are no strange off-gassing odors like you sometimes get with memory foam. Latex mattresses are ideal for people who want a responsive, bouncy feel and may have problems sleeping hot.

Memory Foam

First developed by NASA in the 70s, memory foam is probably the most popular material in the modern mattress market. Memory foam conforms to every inch of your body, giving you maximum comfort and support. Memory foam is also know for its anti-motion properties. Memory foam can be a great choice if you tend to toss and turn at night and sleep with a partner who wakes up when you do. Memory foam mattresses are ideal for people who need pressure relief, good support, and refreshing comfort.

Think About Your Back

Think About Your Back

If you have a bad back, it’s crucial that you find a mattress with proper support. Slat and spring beds often offer plenty of support, but latex and memory foam options have come a long way. If you want memory foam or latex but find the support to be subpar, consider an adjustable base instead of a normal platform. That way, you can always sleep in a comfortable position that benefits your back.

Your Premier Furniture Store
Sullivan's Island, SC

You read that right! Sleep King is the first choice for quality beds in Sullivan's Island, but we also have a huge selection of furniture for your home. If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop for mattresses and furniture alike, you have come to the right place. If you’re shopping for a new mattress at the best price possible, why not throw in a bedroom suite at an amazing price too?

A few common furniture items that our customers love to add
to their mattress purchase include:

Living Room Sets – from traditional-style suites with classic textures to modern sets with attractive upholstery, we will help you find the best living room set for your home.

Bedroom Suites – our bedroom suites range from contemporary to classic and come in a variety of colors and styles to compliment your new mattress purchase.

Daybeds – from English-style daybeds available in espresso and cherry colors to multi-purpose beds with pull-out trundles, our selection of daybeds is unbeatable.

Futons – if you have younger children, they will love our futons. Who are we kidding? Adults do too! Futons are incredibly useful in small spaces and convert into comfy-cozy beds perfect for kids of all ages.

Bunkbeds – bunkbeds are another great option to consider if you have kids. Whether you have a classic-style home or an apartment, we have a style that fits you.

At Sleep King, we are proud to have the lowest prices in the Lowcountry

If you like what you see but don't have time to visit our mattress store in Sullivan's Island, don’t worry. Our online store is bursting with new items and deals every day. From mattresses and bedding to furniture sets and special sale items, Mattress King has got it all. With the highest quality mattresses, the best prices in Sullivan's Island, a giant showroom with all the options, and a full team of helpful sales associates, you won’t ever need to find another mattress and furniture store again!

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island

DHEC says Sullivan’s Island forest cutting will need a permit

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — A plan to thin parts of the maritime forest here will face stricter scrutiny from state regulators after the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control said the cutting is extensive enough that it requires a permit.The thinning is part of a lawsuit settlement reached in October 2020 between the town and some homeowners who live on the edge of the thicket. The plaintiffs wanted more management of the wild land, which has slowly accreted along most of Sullivan’s Island’s beach for dec...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — A plan to thin parts of the maritime forest here will face stricter scrutiny from state regulators after the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control said the cutting is extensive enough that it requires a permit.

The thinning is part of a lawsuit settlement reached in October 2020 between the town and some homeowners who live on the edge of the thicket. The plaintiffs wanted more management of the wild land, which has slowly accreted along most of Sullivan’s Island’s beach for decades. A staunch group of activists on the island, however, want the area mostly left alone.

So the town put together a plan based on the settlement for state and federal regulators to review. The Army Corps of Engineers already determined the work wouldn’t require one of its wetland disturbance permits. But DHEC said in a Dec. 20 letter that in a few parts of the forest, the cutting is significant enough that a state environmental permit is required.

Some parts of the land would be left mostly untouched. But in other areas, the plan calls for removal of several smaller trees.

Specifically, DHEC wrote that in parts of the 100-foot “transition zone” area that is closest to adjacent homes, 96 percent of the trees would be removed, based on a 2014 survey of the plants there.

In a portion of the accreted land area that stretches from the edge of island’s elementary school to Station 28½, 80 percent of the trees would be removed, DHEC wrote.

“This level of tree removal is significant; therefore, a Major Critical Area Permit … would be required if the Town pursues the activities described in the work plan,” the agency wrote.

Sullivan’s Island Town Council did not discuss the letter in its Dec. 21 meeting, when three members of the seven-person panel were absent. Town Administrator Andy Benke said he expects a discussion on the forest in January.

Jamie Hood, an attorney for the homeowners who sued the town and then settled, said in an email that the plaintiffs would keep working with Sullivan’s Island to make sure the plan is approved by the state.

“We will need to consider whether there are modifications to make to the current work plan or if the permit application should be submitted with the current work plan as is,” Hood wrote.

At the same time, a turnover in Town Council since the settlement was reached and pressure from a vocal group of activists on the island may ultimately serve to scuttle the work.

The council recently decided to hire an outside attorney, William Wilkins, to review the settlement. Wilkins, a former federal judge, wrote in a letter earlier this month that the agreement may be unenforceable, because it is too restrictive of the council’s powers to make policy for the town.

But to actually challenge the settlement, the council would have to vote on moving forward with a legal action.

When can I set off fireworks where I live?

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Did the end-of-year fireworks begin a little bit earlier in your neighborhood? Many people across the Lowcountry shared messages online and in community groups after hearing the pop and sizzle of fireworks on Christmas Eve and in the days following.Is that allowed? You might be surprised to find out many local municipalities allow fireworks a little more often than you would imagine.Before you run out and purchase a box of fireworks, it’s important to know where you can – and cannot &...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Did the end-of-year fireworks begin a little bit earlier in your neighborhood? Many people across the Lowcountry shared messages online and in community groups after hearing the pop and sizzle of fireworks on Christmas Eve and in the days following.

Is that allowed? You might be surprised to find out many local municipalities allow fireworks a little more often than you would imagine.

Before you run out and purchase a box of fireworks, it’s important to know where you can – and cannot – set off fireworks in the Lowcountry on New Year’s Eve.

City of North Charleston – Setting off fireworks is legal year-round from 9:00 a.m. until 11:30 p.m., and on holidays like New Year’s Eve and the 4th of July, you can set them off until 1:00 a.m.

City of Hanahan – setting off firecrackers is only legal five days of the year: Christmas Eve, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, and July 4 from 10:00 a.m. until 10:59 p.m.

City of Goose Creek – You can only shoot fireworks in the city on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, and July 4.

Town of Mount Pleasant – You can set off fireworks the day before and the day after a holiday from 9:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. in Mount Pleasant.

Town of James Island – Fireworks are allowed between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. any day including the 4th of July, but that time runs later on New Year’s Eve.

Town of Summerville – People living in town limits can shoot fireworks any day between 10:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m., and on the 4th of July and New Year’s Eve between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m.

Town of Moncks Corner – Fireworks can be discharged on New Year’s Eve from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 a.m., and on July 4 from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.

Purchasing and setting off fireworks in the City of Charleston and on most of the islands is prohibited. This includes Folly Beach, the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Seabrook Island, West Ashley, and the peninsula. You can use sparklers.

Fireworks are allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. for the 4th of July in unincorporated Dorchester County. There are no laws set in unincorporated Charleston County.

If you are unsure, it’s always a safe idea to check with your local government or your Homeowners Association before setting off any fireworks.

South Carolina Department Of Health And Environmental Control ‘Concerned’ About Plans To Trim Maritime Forest

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is “concerned” about how and how many trees would be removed from Sullivan’s Island’s Maritime Forest under a plan created for the town by consultant Thomas & Hutton. In a Dec. 20, 2021 letter, DHEC Beachfront Permitting Project Manager Matthew Slagel wrote that the plan would require a major critical area permit. The plan was developed after a divided Sullivan’s Island Town Council reached an agr...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is “concerned” about how and how many trees would be removed from Sullivan’s Island’s Maritime Forest under a plan created for the town by consultant Thomas & Hutton. In a Dec. 20, 2021 letter, DHEC Beachfront Permitting Project Manager Matthew Slagel wrote that the plan would require a major critical area permit. The plan was developed after a divided Sullivan’s Island Town Council reached an agreement with homeowners who live near the Maritime Forest, apparently settling a lawsuit originally filed in July 2010 and permitting the removal of trees and other vegetation from the Forest. Under the plan, based on a 2014 survey of trees 6 inches in diameter and larger, in one section of the forest, 167 of 174 trees would be removed. In another section, only 16 of 79 trees would remain in place. “DHEC found that in certain areas, 96% of all trees would be removed.

Studies by three federal agencies, including NOAA and FEMA, show that the density and height of vegetation and trees are our most important protection from the No. 1 threat on the island: hurricane storm surge,” said Karen Byko, president of Sullivan’s Island for All, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to preserve the Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest and accreted land in its natural state for the benefit, protection and enjoyment of all. In the Dec. 20 letter, Slagel also raised concerns about how trees and vegetation would be removed. “You have proposed to use a skid steer mower mounted to a small rubber-tired tractor or similar machinery within this area to cut at ground level and mulch in place trees and shrubs 3 inches and smaller. It is our opinion that utilizing machinery in the beach/ dune system will disturb and alter existing soils and topography, even if the trees and shrubs themselves are cut at ground level,” the letter said. Slagel also pointed out that the DHEC Bureau of Water Coastal Stormwater Permitting is working with Thomas & Hutton to obtain information about how changes in vegetation cover might affect stormwater runoff. According to a Sullivan’s Island for All press release, the DHEC letter “shows that this plan is environmentally unsound and goes far beyond vegetation thinning and trimming.” “As DHEC’s stormwater division noted, removing these thousands of trees and shrubs puts the island at much greater risk of flooding,” Byko said. “These trees work as nature’s stormwater pumps. Taking them away for better views puts every homeowner on the island at greater risk.” DHEC’s concerns are not the only thing holding up the implementation of plans to remove trees and other vegetation from the Forest. Of the four Council members who voted to approve the settlement agreement with nearby homeowners, only two remain in office: Greg Hammond and Kaye Smith. Tim Reese was defeated in the May 4 municipal election, and Chauncey Clark lost his bid to unseat Mayor Pat O’Neil.

The new Council, which apparently is considering its options in its effort to change the terms of the agreement, voted in September 2021 to ask the former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth District William W. “Billy’ Wilkins to assess the agreement. Wilkins determined that the agreement is invalid “because its provisions improperly restrict the legislative/governmental powers of successor Town Councils, improperly divest the town of legislative/governmental powers and improperly restrict the proprietary functions of the town.”

Legal expert says Sullivan’s Island maritime forest agreement is unenforceable

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – A legal expert hired to review an agreement reached with the Town of Sullivan’s Island regarding the cutting of a maritime forest has deemed the agreement invalid, in his professional opinion.William Wilkins has “five decades of legal experience, including but not limited to 25 years as a United States District Judge for the District of South Carolina and a United States Circuit Judge for the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.”The settlement would allow the town to pe...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – A legal expert hired to review an agreement reached with the Town of Sullivan’s Island regarding the cutting of a maritime forest has deemed the agreement invalid, in his professional opinion.

William Wilkins has “five decades of legal experience, including but not limited to 25 years as a United States District Judge for the District of South Carolina and a United States Circuit Judge for the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.”

The settlement would allow the town to periodically thin portions of a maritime forest, which advocates say is necessary to maintain a view of the beach. Those in opposition worry about the biodiversity of the island.

Wilkins found that the settlement “is invalid because (A) its provisions constitute an improper restriction of the legislative/governmental powers of successor Town Councils, (B) its provisions constitute an improper delegation and/or divestment of the legislative/governmental powers of the Town, and (C) its provisions unfairly, unreasonably, or improperly restrict the proprietary functions of the town.”

He continued, saying “as a result, provisions of the settlement agreement are unenforceable in law or contract.”

Wilkins was careful to point out, however, that his opinion “is not, and should not be construed as, a guarantee of any legal outcome related to the issues presented; nor does it attempt to determine or comment on the wisdom of any non-legal political issues, such as policy decisions of the Town, or any past or present action by the Town.”

He also noted that it “should not be interpreted as a prohibition or restriction on the Town from taking such action as it determines to be ‘necessary for the health, safety, or general welfare of the Town’ and the public at-large to ‘further or effect’ the ‘Public Policies’ enumerated in the covenants set forth in the deed from the Lowcountry Open Land Trust.”

Wilkins went on to lay out what he sees as potential legal paths forward, which would result in “a judicial determination of the rights and obligations of the Town under the Settlement Agreement.”

Click here to read the opinion in full.

Sullivan’s Island Town Council votes to seek legal review of maritime forest settlement

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Town Council affirmed it would seek an independent lawyer to review the town’s rights under a settlement agreement that cleared the way to remove parts of a maritime forest.The council voted 4-2 during a Sept. 29 special meeting in favor of seeking a legal review of the lawsuit, part of a decadelong issue centering around a conserved forest on the island’s southern half of its beachfront side.The maritime forest, once scrubland, has developed over the years into a mature thicket of tr...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Town Council affirmed it would seek an independent lawyer to review the town’s rights under a settlement agreement that cleared the way to remove parts of a maritime forest.

The council voted 4-2 during a Sept. 29 special meeting in favor of seeking a legal review of the lawsuit, part of a decadelong issue centering around a conserved forest on the island’s southern half of its beachfront side.

The maritime forest, once scrubland, has developed over the years into a mature thicket of trees and wetlands growing outward toward the Atlantic Ocean.

It sprouted on slowly accreting land, a side effect of jetties that stop ocean sand from drifting away from the island — a rarity in South Carolina, where most islands are eroding at various rates.

Four residents living next to the forest filed a lawsuit in 2010 against the town and its council, alleging the government had violated their property rights.

Among their chief complaints: The overgrown, unruly brush harbored vermin and mosquitoes, limited breeze flow and presented a fire hazard.

A local ordinance permitted these residents to trim their bushes to be no less than 3 feet tall, but the town had denied their applications to do so, the suit alleged.

The issue wouldn’t be decided until 10 years later. On Oct. 2, 2020, following private mediation talks, the council voted 4-3 to settle the lawsuit, thus greenlighting the plan to thin the forest.

The agreement reached between the plaintiffs and the town stipulated several tree species and shrubs would be cut depending on their location in the forest, some with diameters as large as 17 inches.

Opponents to the settlement maintain the green space must be conserved and nature should be left to run its course. Many of them had attended the most recent council meeting, requesting members bring the settlement back before a judge to clarify certain parts.

More than two dozen people gathered at the Sept. 29 special meeting, spreading out to follow social distancing guidelines. Some stood along the crowded room’s back wall, eager to speak.

But there was no opportunity for public comment; the council entered executive session almost immediately after the meeting began, much to the chagrin of residents.

Council members debated for around an hour before coming to a vote.

Members Scott Millimet, Justin Novak, Mayor Patrick O’Neil and Gary Visser voted in favor of hiring outside legal counsel while Greg Hammon and Kaye Smith voted against. Councilman Bachman Smith was not present.

Susan Middaugh, who has lived on Sullivan’s since 1980, said she was thrilled with the council’s decision to seek a legal review of the settlement.

Middaugh serves as a board member with Sullivan’s Island For All, a local conservation group staunchly opposed to the settlement. Her main issue is the manner in which the lawsuit was settled, she said.

The four council members who had supported settling weren’t forthcoming during their campaigns on how they felt about preserving the maritime forest, Middaugh said.

But two of them were ousted during the May election, their seats replaced with council members who both oppose the settlement.

Now, conservationists such as Middaugh are hopeful the current council, with its 5-2 majority, will consider any legal recourse that could be taken to amend the lawsuit.

One piece of the settlement the conservationists have pushed against is a “good faith and fair dealing” clause, which stipulates parties to the agreement can’t hinder the cutting work.

A lawyer whom a group of conservationists hired to examine the settlement raised a key question: Would this current agreement unfairly “bind” the council from making future public policy decisions?

“We’re trying to get (Town Council) to at least get a judicial review,” Middaugh explained. “It doesn’t directly challenge the settlement, it’s like a judicial review of the terms of the settlement to see if it’s legal.”

Debate over how to best manage the maritime forest has sharply divided this close-knit island community. The two sides — those for and those against the settlement — fundamentally disagree over many of the issues at play.

Vermin and mosquitoes exist everywhere on the island, and the brush doesn’t present the kind of fire hazard a pine forest would, for example. Breezes are blocked primarily because of large homes stacked several stories high and built next to one another, Middaugh said.

Conservationists also believe the forest serves as an important protective barrier against potential storm surges. But one pro-settlement resident said if a major hurricane hit Sullivan’s Island, the dense vegetation wouldn’t stand a chance.

These people are also adamant the forest is a tinderbox — just think back to the 2009 Myrtle Beach fire, one said.

Both sides, however, can agree the crux of the issue isn’t really about rats, or wildfires, or getting a good breeze. It’s about the view.

The town had placed the maritime forest into a land trust in 1991, after Hurricane Hugo devastated much of the island. The trust protected the forest from being built up, which pleased conservationists as well as ocean homeowners; both the trees and their beach view would be protected.

But the forest grew over time, with little oversight from the town, said pro-settlement residents.

Some people took matters into their own hands, removing nuisance vegetation themselves. The group of four who filed the 2010 lawsuit against the town and council “went about it the right way,” said Kimberly Brown, a Sullivan’s resident since 2015.

Two of the plaintiffs, Ettaleah and Nathan Bluestein, lost the ocean view they had after first moving to the island, along with the ability to even go through their yard, Brown said.

“He has no path to the beach, he’s got no view, he’s got no breeze,” she said, adding the Bluesteins were just trying to get back what they once had.

Brown said she understands conservation-minded folks like Middaugh, and identifies as conservation-minded herself.

“We all are. Everyone loves trees,” she said, adding none of the pro-settlement folks were “looking to wipe everything.”

But the town had promised residents living along the maritime forest it would always maintain the land, along with their ocean views, Brown said.

“The town kind of went back on their word, and that’s what this whole thing is about,” she said.

Some residents felt frustrated following the council’s vote, as it meant more stalling before a final decision would be reached, despite the fact the lawsuit was settled nearly a year ago.

“We had come to an agreement, we mediated, let’s honor it,” Brown said. “If everybody kept going after something when they couldn’t get what they wanted, it’d be kind of lawless.”

The council adjourned after taking its vote without discussing any other business or elaborating on next steps in seeking guidance from an outside attorney.

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