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Sleep King – Where the Prices Are a Sweet Dream!

There are a lot of mattress companies in South Carolina that claim to have the perfect mattress for everyone. At Sleep King, we believe that every person is different and has different needs when it comes to their mattress. That’s why our mattress store in Ridgeville, SC, has a wide variety of beds and brands to choose from. That way, you can find the right mattress for your body and get the very best sleep quality possible.

As a family-owned and operated mattress store with more than 40 years of experience in the sleep industry, we know a thing or two about comfortable mattresses. Ridgeville residents choose Sleep King because we provide our customers with a personalized shopping experience. When you walk through our showroom doors, we want you to feel comfortable – both on our mattresses and with our store associates. At Sleep King, you won’t ever have to worry about pushy salespeople and limited selection. Instead, you will discover that we encourage you to take your time as you search for your next bed. Sleep is incredibly important, and by proxy, finding the right mattress for your body type is too.

When you visit our showroom in Ridgeville, know that we are a full-service store with mattress experts ready to help. From questions about mattresses and their warranties to financing and mattress delivery, there’s no question we haven’t heard before.

We carry some of the most popular brands in America, and unlike other mattress stores in Ridgeville, offer them at the lowest prices around, guaranteed. There’s a reason why we were voted your #1 mattress store in the Lowcountry – because we truly care about our customers and their quality of sleep!

Looking for discounts? Need to buy your mattress on a strict budget? We’ve got you covered at our new mattress clearance center in Ridgeville, where we have more than 50 models on display at 50-80% off retail value. Don’t forget to ask us about our flexible financing options, where no credit is needed to make a purchase. Paying cash? We’ll knock 5% off your bill!

As if that weren’t enough reason to visit, remember that we provide free delivery, setup, and removal of your old mattress for FREE when you make a purchase at Sleep king.

Why Choose Our Mattress
Store in Ridgeville, SC?

Our business model is simple – give customers quality beds from national brands at amazing prices, coupled with unmatched customer service. We know that your sleep is essential but also understand that normal folks aren’t made of money. You need a solution that isn’t going to break the bank, which is why we offer up to 75% off our products.

When we say we have a bed for every budget, we’re serious.
A few of our mix and match deals include:

Sets Prize
Twin Mattress Sets Beginning at $99
Full Mattress Sets Beginning at $139
Queen Mattress Sets Beginning at $149
King Mattress Sets Beginning at $299

Of course, a mattress would be incomplete without a headboard, footboard, and rails. For queen mattresses, those items combined are only $199. At our mattress store, we pledge to beat any competitor’s price on similar product specs – guaranteed! Here are just a few of the benefits of shopping at Mattress King

  • *FREE* Bed Frame for Your New Bed*
  • *FREE* Same-Day Local Mattress Delivery to Your Home*
  • *FREE* Set-Up & Removal of Old Mattress from Your Home*
  • *FREE* Mattress Pad Included with New Mattress*
  • Rest Easy with Our 60-Day Comfort Guarantee
  • We Have the Best Selection of Mattresses in Ridgeville with Five National Vendors
  • On-Time Delivery
  • Best Warranties in the Industry
  • Sleep King Will Beat Anyone’s Advertise Price by $50*(on purchases $299 and above)
  • 0% Financing for 48 Months (APR, With Approved Credit)
  • *See Store for Additional Details
Our Selection of National Mattress Brands

Our Selection of
National Mattress
Brands

At Sleep King, we carry the largest selection of high-quality national brand mattresses in Ridgeville.

Sleep King Tempurpedic Mattresses

Sleep King Tempurpedic Mattresses

Often considered the best mattress brand in the world, innovation sets Tempurpedic mattresses apart from others. Our customers love Tempurpedic mattresses because they are expertly built through decades of research and rigorous testing. The folks at Tempurpedic are committed to precision, meaning every detail of product detail they push is geared towards the ultimate satisfaction and comfort.

Sleep King Serta iComfort Mattresses

Sleep King Serta iComfort Mattresses

Serta iComfort: Serta’s iComfort line of mattresses are multi-layered beds with cooling foam technology that adds resilience, support, and temperature control. The result is a cool, comfy sleep that leaves you refreshed and ready to attack the day.

Sleep King Simmons Beautysleep Mattresses

Sleep King Simmons Beautysleep Mattresses

Every mattress in the Simmons Beautysleep lineup has a great combo of support and comfort, making for a restful night’s sleep. With heavy-gauge coils and high-performance materials, these mattresses are durable and built to last. Be sure to try one of these mattresses out in our showroom – our customers love the pocketed coils and minimal motion transfer.

Sleep King Bed Boss Mattresses

Sleep King Bed Boss Mattresses

The Bed Boss brand is lesser known than some, like Tempurpedic. Still, it is a quality product with many foam and non-foam options that we think you’ll love. Choose from standard memory foam, hybrid, and innerspring options while visiting our showroom in Ridgeville.

Tips on Choosing the Best Bed

There’s much more to choosing a good bed than how you think it will look in your bedroom. There’s plenty to think about, from innerspring options to memory foam and even hybrid mattresses. At Sleep King, our priority is our customers. We pride ourselves on excellent customer service. We want to do right by you, which why we want to be sure you find the perfect bed when you visit our mattress store in Ridgeville, SC. To help you get started, here are a few tips on choosing the best bed for your sleep needs.

Visit a Showroom

Visit a Showroom

This tip might seem like a no-brainer to some, but it’s important that you visit a showroom so that you can lay on different beds to get a feel for what you like. At Mattress King, you will have the chance to explore different styles, designs, and shapes, and mattress materials. Finding a bed online at a price you can afford is great, but you should lie on the bed first, not just look at it on a screen.

Determine Budget

Determine Budget

Here’s a surprising fact: just because a mattress costs more money, it doesn’t mean it’s going to be a better bed. Sure, more expensive beds might have newer technologies and materials, but not everyone has the budget to walk into a mattress store in Ridgeville and spend $3,000. Figure out what price range you’re comfortable paying and look at the best options for your bottom line.

Consider Bedroom Size

Consider Bedroom Size

Before you swing by our showroom and start trying out beds, it might be a good idea to measure the space where your new mattress will go. If your bedroom is on the small side, a king-sized bed might be too big. Similarly, a small bed in a huge room might make for strange aesthetics. Aim for a reasonable amount of room around your bed – enough where you can walk around comfortably. As mentioned above, get specific measurements of the area you plan to use. That way, you have peace of mind knowing your new mattress will fit in your bedroom.

Consider Bedroom Size

Choose a Mattress Material

This tip often comes down to personal preference. It will take a little bit of trial and error to figure out which material works best for your back – innerspring, memory foam, or latex. While your friend’s and family’s opinions matter, keep in mind that their mattress choice was subjective. What works for them won’t necessarily work for you.

Need a quick refresher on different mattress materials? Here’s a quick overview

Innerspring

Also called coil mattresses, innerspring beds are probably the most well-known on this short list. Innerspring mattresses are often more affordable than their latex and memory foam counterparts. These beds are ideal for people who want a lot of support and a cooler night’s sleep.

Latex

This material is known for its great cooling properties and overall comfort. With latex, there are no strange off-gassing odors like you sometimes get with memory foam. Latex mattresses are ideal for people who want a responsive, bouncy feel and may have problems sleeping hot.

Memory Foam

First developed by NASA in the 70s, memory foam is probably the most popular material in the modern mattress market. Memory foam conforms to every inch of your body, giving you maximum comfort and support. Memory foam is also know for its anti-motion properties. Memory foam can be a great choice if you tend to toss and turn at night and sleep with a partner who wakes up when you do. Memory foam mattresses are ideal for people who need pressure relief, good support, and refreshing comfort.

Think About Your Back

Think About Your Back

If you have a bad back, it’s crucial that you find a mattress with proper support. Slat and spring beds often offer plenty of support, but latex and memory foam options have come a long way. If you want memory foam or latex but find the support to be subpar, consider an adjustable base instead of a normal platform. That way, you can always sleep in a comfortable position that benefits your back.

Your Premier Furniture Store
Ridgeville, SC

You read that right! Sleep King is the first choice for quality beds in Ridgeville, but we also have a huge selection of furniture for your home. If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop for mattresses and furniture alike, you have come to the right place. If you’re shopping for a new mattress at the best price possible, why not throw in a bedroom suite at an amazing price too?

A few common furniture items that our customers love to add
to their mattress purchase include:

Living Room Sets – from traditional-style suites with classic textures to modern sets with attractive upholstery, we will help you find the best living room set for your home.

Bedroom Suites – our bedroom suites range from contemporary to classic and come in a variety of colors and styles to compliment your new mattress purchase.

Daybeds – from English-style daybeds available in espresso and cherry colors to multi-purpose beds with pull-out trundles, our selection of daybeds is unbeatable.

Futons – if you have younger children, they will love our futons. Who are we kidding? Adults do too! Futons are incredibly useful in small spaces and convert into comfy-cozy beds perfect for kids of all ages.

Bunkbeds – bunkbeds are another great option to consider if you have kids. Whether you have a classic-style home or an apartment, we have a style that fits you.

At Sleep King, we are proud to have the lowest prices in the Lowcountry

If you like what you see but don't have time to visit our mattress store in Ridgeville, don’t worry. Our online store is bursting with new items and deals every day. From mattresses and bedding to furniture sets and special sale items, Mattress King has got it all. With the highest quality mattresses, the best prices in Ridgeville, a giant showroom with all the options, and a full team of helpful sales associates, you won’t ever need to find another mattress and furniture store again!

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Latest News in Ridgeville

Ridgeville residents in historically Black neighborhood push back against development

RIDGEVILLE — There are two ways that families spell the last name Coburn. There’s “Coburn” as in Coburn Town Road and there’s also “Cobin.”Ethel Cooke, a lifelong resident in the predominately Black community, said her parents told her the mix-up probably comes from some of the neighborhood’s ancestors who were sharecroppers.“They couldn’t read or write,” she said.So the name was spelled on records however it ended up being pronounced.As Cooke sits,...

RIDGEVILLE — There are two ways that families spell the last name Coburn. There’s “Coburn” as in Coburn Town Road and there’s also “Cobin.”

Ethel Cooke, a lifelong resident in the predominately Black community, said her parents told her the mix-up probably comes from some of the neighborhood’s ancestors who were sharecroppers.

“They couldn’t read or write,” she said.

So the name was spelled on records however it ended up being pronounced.

As Cooke sits, telling stories about the community of Coburn Town, the one about the names makes her and others smile. It’s part of what makes this place special — the shared history — and a symbol of what could be lost as growth starts to transform the area.

“We don’t know what’s coming,” said Elizabeth Crum Huffman, another lifelong resident.

Located off School Street, the Coburn Town community is surrounded by trees, open fields, a railroad track and a closed sawmill. Many of the original Black residents saved money and purchased land in the area following the end of slavery.

Nearly 180 acres surrounding the community were recently approved for rezoning by Dorchester County Council. Those rezoned parcels, including the old Ashley River Lumber Co., will now fall under what the county refers to as commercial light-industrial.

Officials expect it likely will soon hold a warehouse, but no development plans have been approved.

It’s one piece of a larger list of changes that highlights Ridgeville as an area of growth. Other indicators include new housing developments, road projects and industrial spaces like the Walmart Distribution Center.

But with a question mark around its future, community members are reflecting even more on what the quiet and familiar community means to them and what it meant to their ancestors who purchased the land to have something of their own.

‘We came up the hard way’

Though it’s been years since farming was the main source of income in the community, it’s still possible to see some of its agricultural roots.

There are open fields that sit on the edges and the rusted fences that used to hold livestock.

Take away the paved roads and some of the home renovations. Picture in its place a couple of wagons, tobacco and potato fields and mules, and it’s easy to imagine what the place looked like when Black residents first poured into it.

Walking down Coburn Town Road, Huffman and her sister Virginia Crum said they can remember having to do farming chores as children and just tossing all of the seeds in the field without any order.

Harvest time would usually give them away, they said laughing.

Their father, Willie Kizer Crum Sr., and mother, Hermena Robinson Crum, had 10 children: seven girls and three boys. The couple married in the 1940s. Willie’s father was a sharecropper.

Virginia Crum, a retired educator, said their father bought the land they live on now. Some of the things she remembers the most about him is he didn’t like buying things on credit and always paid in cash.

Down the street lives James Wesley Duggins Jr., a 78-year-old man who grew up in Coburn Town.

Standing outside working in his yard, he laughed about how annoying the nearby railroad can be with the sound of trains coming through.

His father, James Wesley Duggins Sr., helped build the railroad tracks. “Look now, the machines do all that,” Duggins said.

His family moved to the area around the 1920s.

While talking with the sisters, he reminded Crum she integrated Ridgeville Elementary when she was in the first grade. She was born in 1959.

“There’s so much history,” Crum said.

And while there are tons of happy memories, like playing baseball around some of the farm animals and staying over at each others’ houses, the community also remembers how their elders struggled.

There were times as children when they had to run through the woods to avoid White children throwing rocks, Duggins said.

Huffman and Crum’s mother often had to travel as far as Charleston to sell goods because the White residents in Ridgeville at the time severely underpaid them, they said.

“We had some strong Black people in the community,” Crum said.

Cooke remembers being a child and having a White boy spit at her when they were in town one day.

“I said, ‘Daddy, that ain’t right,’ ” Cooke said. Her father, she recalled, encouraged her to let it go for her own safety.

She also remembers sitting outside and working in a yard for a family for whom her grandmother cooked and cleaned. She wasn’t allowed to come inside the home.

After working in the yard, Cooke laughed and said all she got for it was an orange dress. “And it had a hole in it,” she said.

She said she can’t imagine what her grandmother was paid.

“We came up the hard way,” Cooke said.

There was a time when everyone in their community was a Coburn-Cobin. But with different marriages, other names started to appear.

Two of Crum and Huffman’s aunts married into the Coburn-Cobin family. One of the aunts married Cooke’s grandfather.

Outside of marriages, they said, the community has always felt like one big family that supported each other.

When Cooke’s family was struggling when she was raised, she said, Huffman and Crum’s father would routinely give them potatoes to help them get by.

No one really knew or talked about it.

“Now you borrow sugar and the whole city would know it,” Cooke said.

A growing town

On Nov. 1, as 180 acres surrounding Coburn Town was rezoned to commercial-light industrial, community members and descendants poured in to raise their concerns.

Many noted the things they wanted to see. Crum emphasized helping the schools and adding facilities like health and community centers. Huffman said she would love to see more sidewalks because she enjoys a daily walk.

Tim Lewis and Felicia Cobin can trace their history in the area as far back as 1829. Rebecca Cobin was buried near the community in the late 1940s. She was born in 1883.

“We really want to look at how we can grow together,” Lewis said. “There’s history here.”

Ridgeville’s growth has been a big topic in the past couple of years. Federal funds around COVID-19 relief will bring $6.8 million in roadway improvements around the Ridgeville Industrial Campus.

At the same campus, a Walmart Distribution Center is slated to bring hundreds of jobs to the area, increasing truck traffic.

The county is also expanding water access. Many Coburn Town residents use wells.

In conjunction with new housing developments, there’s a lot more movement in the Ridgeville area.

Dorchester County Councilman David Chinnis said many things the community wants depend on rooftops. No development plans have been approved around the rezoned property near Coburn Town.

“We don’t know what’s being built there,” Chinnis said.

He encouraged residents to continue their involvement. But whatever comes, he said, the goal would be to protect the community with features like buffers.

The county is also looking to start working on a Ridgeville/Givhans Area Growth Management Plan. The plan has one more layer of council approval to go through before work can start on creating it.

The goal with the plan is to raise awareness about infrastructure concerns and funding. Local community members hope to be a part of the planning process. “Understand that this community is growing,” Chinnis said.

And while a lot of the area community members are still wary, many said they still plan to keep pressing on the council to protect the community.

The unknown

Feelings around growth in Coburn Town are mixed.

Some are nervous with the uncertainty about what’s to come and what it means about preserving their land and history.

“I was able to share that history with my children,” said Taneeka Wright.

Her grandfather, John Henry Pinckney, was a welder and mechanic who lived in Coburn Town. Her grandmother, Ethel Mae Pinkney, was a cook.

She said she enjoyed showing her children around the community and how she grew up. She remembers having to invent games with friends and families because there weren’t a lot of things to play with.

“And I would love to share that history with my grandchildren,” she said.

Others in the community are pessimistic and said they know significant change is inevitable.

“It’s not going to be the same anymore,” said Franklin Pinckney, a lifelong resident and a local high school football star at the old Harley-Ridgeville High School.

All he said he remembers now are the body aches.

“It’s not going to be the same anymore,” he said thinking about the future and the thought of hearing loud trucks and movement in a community that tends to be quiet and slow.

One resident said he doesn’t have any fear.

“I like to try and be real,” said Wendell Coburn, 81.

Coburn manages his dementia and lives with his wife Betty, 71. With his condition, Betty is still able to communicate with him and help him have conversations with people.

Community members said he might struggle with the present but he can still hold conversations about the past.

Wendell built their Coburn Town Road home more than 40 years ago. He was raised by a single mother who had to walk 3 miles to work.

He’s known in the community as being someone who was always willing to lend a helping hand without even being asked. Residents said the influence of his mother and the community is all over him. “They preserved him for me,” Betty said with a laugh.

She married into the community.

To Wendell, community connection and talking with people are important. He describes Corburn Town as a community of caring.

When asked to spell his last name, Wendell makes sure people know it’s with the “urn” and not the “in.”

“If you can’t communicate with people, you’re doing nothing,” he said.

In a 1900 census interview of Ransom Coburn it points to the Coburn-Cobin family origin being in Virginia around the Jamestown area.

The descendants believe they came to South Carolina either for work collecting turpentine or constructing the railroads.

Dorchester County gets nearly $7M grant for Ridgeville Road improvements

RIDGEVILLE — One of Dorchester County’s soon to be even-busier roads has been awarded millions in funding.The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration has awarded nearly $7 million to the county to fund the widening of a portion of S.C. Highway 27, also known as Ridgeville Road.Between the road’s connection to Interstate 26 and the Ridgeville Industrial Campus, S.C. 27 will be widened from two to five lanes. This comes after the county announced the upcoming arrival of a Walmart ...

RIDGEVILLE — One of Dorchester County’s soon to be even-busier roads has been awarded millions in funding.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration has awarded nearly $7 million to the county to fund the widening of a portion of S.C. Highway 27, also known as Ridgeville Road.

Between the road’s connection to Interstate 26 and the Ridgeville Industrial Campus, S.C. 27 will be widened from two to five lanes. This comes after the county announced the upcoming arrival of a Walmart Distribution Center to the industrial campus.

The center is slated to bring more than 1,000 jobs to the area, as well as hundreds of spaces for trucks. This means more traffic for the already heavily used highway.

“The timing of the EDA grant could not have been better,” said County Council Chairman Bill Hearn.

He also said they hope the improvements will alleviate traffic off of the smaller roads that residents frequent.

The funding comes as part of the EDA’s CARES Act Recovery Assistance grant program.

John Truluck, the county’s economic development director, said the administration would only award a maximum of $2 million prior to the pandemic.

The CARES Act, a federal coronavirus aid bill, provided the Economic Development Administration with $1.5 billion in COVID-19 relief funding.

Truluck said, with the additional funding, the administration increased the maximum amount in grants and also opened the program up to projects that didn’t involve job creation.

The county applied for the funds in July 2020 to help with the estimated $8 million project. This was before the Walmart Distribution Center was announced.

In addition to the road-widening, officials said the S.C. 27 improvements will also be an opportunity to expand access to the county’s public water system. The Dorchester Reach, a more than 10-mile water line between the town of Harleyville and the Ridgeville Industrial Park, was completed in 2020.

But, as the Ridgeville area has started to see growth, residents have raised concerns over the increase in traffic. Some of the biggest worries have been increased road damage and unrepaired potholes.

Kenneth Green lives off of S.C. 27 on Jared Lane. He said there have been times when large holes have remained on the two-lane road for months. So the improvements are needed, he said.

Most of the road damage that’s present, he said, comes from the already heavy truck traffic the road sees. The distribution center will add to it.

“You get all kinds of trucks coming through here,” he said.

There are also plans to widen I-26 near its intersection with S.C. 27. In addition, the county is working on a nearly $30 million major improvement project for U.S. Highway 78.

The highway sits next to the industrial campus.

Officials said the overall goal with the projects is to get ahead of the notable increase in traffic that’s expected with the opening of the Walmart Distribution Center by April 2022.

Polestar Reveals Sales Results: 29,000 In 2021

Polestar reports that in 2021 it met its "global sales target of 29,000," which represents year-over-year growth exceeding 185%.The company does not provide details, but the overwhelming majority of the sales fall on the Polestar 2 all-electric car (a small number* of sales might be ...

Polestar reports that in 2021 it met its "global sales target of 29,000," which represents year-over-year growth exceeding 185%.

The company does not provide details, but the overwhelming majority of the sales fall on the Polestar 2 all-electric car (a small number* of sales might be Polestar 1 plug-in hybrid cars).

"The company delivered on its global sales target of 29,000 vehicles in 2021, representing year-on-year growth exceeding 185%."

Polestar 2 entered series production in China in March 2020, and the first cars arrived in Europe in mid-2020.

Assuming the numbers provided by the manufacturer, we can estimate also the 2020 sales result:

Polestar says that last year, the global presence of the brand expanded from 10 to 19 markets. In the first half of 2022, a few more countries will be added: Spain, Portugal and Ireland in Europe, as well as the UAE, Kuwait and Israel in the Middle East. The plan is to expand to at least 30 global markets by the end of 2023.

Also, the retail footprint is expanding:

"Polestar’s retail footprint more than doubled in 2021 to 100 locations globally and the company aims to have 150 in operation by the end of 2022. In addition to the openings of inner-city Polestar Spaces, the company debuted its new, larger, out-of-town Polestar Destinations. The first permanent Polestar Destination opened in December 2021, outside Gothenburg, Sweden."

One of the most important things for Polestar will be the upcoming business combination with Gores Guggenheim, Inc. (Nasdaq: GGPI, GGPIW, and GGPIU), which is expected to close in the first half of 2022.

Polestar is also expected to launch its second all-electric car, the Polestar 3 - described as a premium electric performance SUV - in 2022 (see the teaser here). This new model will be produced in the U.S. at Volvo's Ridgeville plant in South Carolina alongside the all-electric successor of the Volvo XC90.

In 2023, the lineup will be expanded by the Polestar 4, and by 2024 it should consist of a total of five models. The fifth will be the Polestar 5 flagship sedan.

* the plan was to produce only 1,500 Polestar 1 over a period of a few years, before the company will go all-electric

Working Wednesdays: New Walmart Import Distribution Center hiring to fill 1300-1500 jobs

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The brand new Walmart Import Distribution Center will open soon in Ridgeville and you can learn more about employment opportunities at the massive facility on Working Wednesdays.The center is bringing more than 1000 local jobs to the area.“We’re probably gonna be more so looking into 1300-1500 jobs that we’ll be hiring to be able to support this facility and all the volume we’ll be pushing out of it, General Manager Jeff Holzbauer said.Imported goods will arrive through t...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The brand new Walmart Import Distribution Center will open soon in Ridgeville and you can learn more about employment opportunities at the massive facility on Working Wednesdays.

The center is bringing more than 1000 local jobs to the area.

“We’re probably gonna be more so looking into 1300-1500 jobs that we’ll be hiring to be able to support this facility and all the volume we’ll be pushing out of it, General Manager Jeff Holzbauer said.

Imported goods will arrive through the South Carolina port, and will be stored and sorted at the Walmart Import Distribution Center for delivery to approximately 850 Walmart and Sam’s Clubs throughout South Carolina and other states in the southeast.

“So we will actually start receiving product Feb. 1 of next year, and start shipping product out April 5,” Holzbauer said.

The main focus now is filling positions for freight handlers. The job pays $18 - $19.35 per hour, depending on the shift. Click here to apply.

“The week of Oct. 11 we will start going after a large number of associates to be able to help us with that receiving of the product.”

Other positions include hourly leads, maintenance technicians, order fillers, unloader/processors, and environmental health and safety associates.

The 3-million-square-foot facility is the equivalent of 52 football fields. Dorchester County Economic Development officials say construction should wrap up by the end of the year. The first shipment of goods should arrive at the center by early February, and distribution is expected to start by early April.

Working Wednesdays is a weekly segment that focuses on employment opportunities. You will learn about companies around the Lowcountry, and the current and future positions they have available. The interview will live stream at 1p.m. on Live 5 Facebook, Live5News.com and Apple, Amazon Fire and Roku tv.

Ann McGill will talk with representatives from the companies to get in depth information about the types of services and products they provide, as well as training, benefits and other information to help you decide if it’s a company you might want to work for.

Once the livestream is finished, it will be shared right here at Live5News.com and on Live 5 Facebook.

If your business would like to share job information through this format, send an email to amcgill@live5news.com and be sure to put ‘Working Wednesdays’ in the subject line.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Public hearing to be held on Ridgeville commercial rezoning effort near historic community

SUMMERVILLE — Ridgeville-area residents will soon have a formal opportunity to raise concerns over a recent controversial rezoning effort that could affect a historic Black neighborhood.On Oct. 18, the Dorchester County Planning, Development and Building Committee will have its regularly scheduled meeting. During the meeting, the council will hold a public hearing on a rezoning request for nearly 180 acres of land located near Campbell Thickett Road in Ridgeville.The owner, Joe Branton, has requested officials rezone the ...

SUMMERVILLE — Ridgeville-area residents will soon have a formal opportunity to raise concerns over a recent controversial rezoning effort that could affect a historic Black neighborhood.

On Oct. 18, the Dorchester County Planning, Development and Building Committee will have its regularly scheduled meeting. During the meeting, the council will hold a public hearing on a rezoning request for nearly 180 acres of land located near Campbell Thickett Road in Ridgeville.

The owner, Joe Branton, has requested officials rezone the property from absence of control to commercial light-industrial. Some of the permitted uses with this rezoning would range from agriculture and open space to business offices and manufacturing spaces.

Part of the 180-acre property is already developed as the Ashley River Lumber Yard.

At the last couple of County Council meetings, the request sparked some uproar from Ridgeville residents who will live in a small neighborhood near the rezoned property around Coburn Town Road.

Residents said they fear the rezoning could bring significant change to an area that isn’t ready for it. Coburn Town and parts of Campbell Thickett Road are very narrow and won’t benefit from any increases in traffic in their current forms, they argue.

If a new development closes off Coburn Town Road and makes it a dead end street, residents said that would have a severe impact on emergency services getting into the community.

“We are a small community,” said Felicia Cobin, a lifelong Ridgeville resident. “They’re getting ready to put us into a box.”

At the most recent council meeting on Oct. 4, some of those Coburn Town residents also highlighted the area’s importance as a historic Black neighborhood.

Cobin and Tim Lewis, another Ridgeville resident, said they can trace their family history in the neighborhood as far back as 1829. After slavery, they said, many Black residents in the area saved their money to build homes there.

Many of the residents also share last names with streets in the area, like Cobin and Crum Lane.

“It’s more than just a community,” Lewis said.

In the next couple of years, the Ridgeville area is expected to be a target for growth. The Walmart Distribution Center slated for the Ridgeville Industrial Campus is expected to bring more than 1,000 jobs to the area by spring 2022.

Road-widening projects on U.S. Highway 78 and S.C. Highway 27 are expected to help with that growth impact.

Some of the Coburn Town-area residents said they aren’t necessarily opposed to growth. They just want to have more input and more transparency from builders and project managers on what their plans are.

Virgina Crum, a Coburn Town resident, said she would like to see a new health or community center. Elizabeth Crum Huffman said she will live right next to the rezoned property. She said she would love to see features like sidewalks constructed before any potential manufacturing projects.

“I’m going to keep fighting,” Huffman said. “That’s mine.”

Some of the biggest complaints around the rezoning have been due to the uncertainty about what the plans are for the more than 180-acre property. Branton, the property owner, couldn’t be reached for comment.

The public hearing will be at 4:45 p.m. Oct. 18 at the Summerville County Council Chambers off North Cedar Street.

Some residents pushed for the public hearing to be held in Ridgeville. Many of the community members are elderly and may not be able to make it down to Summerville.

Councilman David Chinnis, who also is chairman of the Planning, Development and Building Committee, said that wouldn’t be possible because it would mean that every public hearing around a rezoning effort would then have to be held in the property owner’s town.

There are also other items outside of the Ridgeville rezoning that the committee has to address.

Chinnis also said residents will likely leave the meeting with more questions. Branton has not supplied them with documents such as an impact study or development plans. Officials said he is likely to sell the property.

“I can’t stop him from building,” Chinnis said.

He added the committee going through a second reading, or secondary approval on the rezoning, does not automatically mean it will be accepted. He and other councilmembers encourage community members to attend the hearing.

“We have not passed things on third readings,” Chinnis said.

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